A Startup Marketing Framework (Version 2)

I’ve recently published a new version of this Framework – check out the Startup Marketing Framework V3. Back when I was running my consulting business I published a marketing framework that I used as a tool to explain to startups the types of things that I could help them with.  I thought it would be useful for startup marketing folks as a guide and I think it has been – it continues to be one of the most popular posts on this site. Since then, I’ve gotten a lot of smart feedback on the framework and I’m also back to working inside a company again so I thought it would be interesting to revisit the framework. Assumptions As I explained earlier, this framework doesn’t intend to cover Product Management (the Pragmatic Marketing Framework does a good job of that) but rather the intention was to look at it from a purely marketing point of view.  This Framework makes the assumption that you have a product in market, you feel fairly confident that you have a good fit between your market and your offering and you are ready to invest in lead generation. If you aren’t there yet, there is a lot here that you won’t need to (and more importantly, shouldn’t) worry about yet.   Lastly, my background is more Business to Business marketing so like everything else on this site, this has a B2B slant to it.  That said, I think most of it is very applicable to a B2C startup. Market Knowledge Segments – Based on your interaction with early customers, these are the segments that have the...

How Do CMOs Define Product Marketing?

I was honored to be asked by the folks at Forrester to speak at their first ever Product Marketing Summit this week. Forrester runs a set of Technology Leadership boards that allow very senior marketers to network together and share best practices.  This meeting was unique in that the group consisted of CMO and VP level leaders at B2B tech companies that are responsible for Product Marketing. We kicked off the day with a discussion around how we each would define Product Marketing.  To illustrate how poorly most people understand Product Marketing, the Forrester folks put up the Wikipedia definition: Product marketing deals with the first of the “4P”‘s of marketing, which are Product, Pricing, Place, and Promotion. Product marketing, as opposed to product management, deals with more outbound marketing tasks. For example, product management deals with the nuts and bolts of product development within a firm, whereas product marketing deals with marketing the product to prospects, customers, and others. Product marketing, as a job function within a firm, also differs from other marketing jobs such as marketing communications (“marcom”), online marketing, advertising, marketing strategy, etc. This so-called “definition” is not only laughably vague but the idea that a tech product marketer doesn’t have to worry about stuff like “Place” and “Promotion” was enough to get some belly laughs out of a room of senior product marketers. To facilitate coming up with a more complete definition we did an exercise where the attendees wrote down list of things they are responsible for and then we broke those up into categories.  The categories we used were taken from my Product...